Times are changing, and so are the traditional Fashions on the Field competitions. For years FOTF was hosted at race tracks around the country with entrants showing off their creations and styling on a catwalk, twirling and smiling trying to catch the judge’s eye.

Now with the rise of the photo competition, it’s more important than ever to get your pose down pat and have a few tricks up your sleeve to ensure the photo captures the true essence of your outfit.

In this post I discuss some of the recent changes to the Myer Fashions on the Field state finals and ask racing fashion photographer Wendell Teodoro to provide some practical tips for how to pose when you find yourself in front of the camera.

Fashions on the field entrants traditional format

Image credit: www.flemington.com.au

The First Photo Competition

Two year’s ago, the first big photo booth competition format emerged at Royal Randwick Moët & Chandon Spring Champion Stakes Day with their unveiling of ‘The Fashion Chute’.

royal randwick fashion chute photo competition

Entrants were skeptical about the new photo format with the majority being against the idea. How could you showcase your beautifully put together outfit with a quick snap in a photo booth? How can you make sure none of its beauty or detail is lost in the photos? And more importantly, how can it be an even playing field for those who don’t know how to pose or think they aren’t photogenic?

Royal randwick FOTF photo competition booth

My awkward go-to pose. Chrissy (right) was actually the Myer NSW State Final second runner up on this same day but didn’t make it through to the photo finals.

The first photo booth competition I entered, I had an average photo taken. I was one of the lucky ones. I heard many ladies complain the main detail of their outfit was on the back, and with just one photo taken for submission, the detail was lost.

Others said half their standout feature was the way their skirt moved when they walked or that their millinery was chopped off in the frame and that their photo was blurry or they weren’t ready.

Changes to the Myer FOTF State Finals

This year, Myer announced some big changes were coming to their annual National FOTF competition. We eagerly waited and waited, sending emails for any kind of confirmation there would even be a state final.

Myer announces changes to fashions on the field

Finally, after a long, much anticipated 8 months and just 3 months before Melbourne Cup Week, Flemington released the information we had all been suspecting.

Myer Photo Competition details

The Myer FOTF competition was moving with the times and would take on a fresh digital format. This meant the State finals would all be held via a photo competition, mostly on the same day in Spring. Hopefuls would head to the locations set out amongst each state to be photographed by a professional photographer.

crystal kimber national winner photo entry

Crystal Kimber, last year’s Myer National FOTF winner, shows us the type of photos we can expect to have taken at this year’s State Finals.

The photographer would take ‘street style’ snaps. This means you won’t be standing up against a blank wall trying to pose but instead be captured with movement, taking note of up close special details. Three photos will be submitted to be judged by an esteemed panel who will choose the 1st, 2nd and 3rd from each state.

‘Uhoh, but I’m not Photogenic’

There was a lot of discussion in the Field Fashion Community Facebook Group, with many women worried they would not take a good photo, thus jeopardizing their shot at a state title.

With so much at stake I thought I would take it upon myself to interview established racing fashion photographer Wendell Teodoro to tell us his best tips for taking a great photo and posing the right way.

milano imai posing with wendell teodoro

If anyone has worked with Wendell before, then you will know he makes taking photos easy with his expert direction. Even fo